Archive for April, 2008

compact family home

Tuesday, April 29th, 2008

Richard Horden in BD on the development (2 years on) of his micro compact home:

Horden is now working on the family compact home, where kids have their own cube. ‘I’m constantly coming up with variants,’ he says. ‘Next is a low-carbon version. It could be built like a car on a production line, but we don’t have enough orders.’ So how many have been sold? ‘We’ve only built 15 and haven’t sold any… yet. I get emails saying what a wonderful idea. Of course when they see it, it’s much too small for most people.’

Size: 2.6m x 2.6m

Price:

“m-ch units are available to purchase for delivery to geographical Europe at a guide price of EUR 25,000 to EUR 34,000 (subject to contract). This price includes all interior fittings. Subject to site conditions, the price excludes delivery, installation, connection to services, consultant’s fees and taxes.”

Cost per sq m: 3698.22 EUR

mch

photo credit

Grantham Caravans on their Sterling Onyx micro compact home:

We always have an excellent selection of new and used caravans for sale. The comprehensive touring caravan accessory shop is well worth visiting. We display all the latest caravan and leisure equipment and run special offers throughout the year. We are specialists in touring caravan insurance. We also have a coffee shop.

A warm welcome awaits you at Grantham Caravans – we look forward to seeing you.

onyx

Size: 5.51m x 2.29m

Price:

EUR 20,232.26 – deliver it yourself, no need to connect to services, no consultant’s fees or taxes.

Cost per sq m: 1603.45 EUR

Think08

Monday, April 28th, 2008

I’ll be attending Think 08 next week and taking part in the session at 4:30pm on the 7th, thanks to an invite to present from Phil Clark.

Here’s the summary of the session:

Embracing the existing estate and communities

What’s already built is a much greater part of our built environment than new development. How do we tackle the existing estate to deliver greater sustainability in social, economic and environmental terms? A panel will discuss the issues generated and solutions required by outdated workplaces, ageing housing stock and the sustainability problems they cause. This will include a consideration or legislative hurdles in tackling the built stock as well as a live example of green refurbishment work being carried out on Victorian properties in Newcastle-Under-Lyme.

Chair: Denise Chevin, Editor, Building
Kate Symons, Associate Director, Building Research Establishment
David Strong, Chief Executive, Inbuilt Consulting,
Rob Annable, Director, Axis Design Architects
Dr Douglas Robertson, Head of Applied Social Sciences, Stirling University
and Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Roger Hawkins, Director, Hawkins Brown

And here’s the PDF of the full program: Think08 program

If there are any fellow bloggers attending on the Wednesday it would be great to meet up, so drop me a line!

twitterature

Tuesday, April 15th, 2008


twitterature, originally uploaded by eversion.

If Hemingway were alive today I’m sure he’d approve.

Small but perfectly formed twitterature, delivered in
short
bursts
to
your
mobile
for
free
by
Rod

quality of the silence

Monday, April 7th, 2008

Radio 3 interviews are ripe for the picking of architectural metaphors.

In the time honoured blogging tradition of curating x and pointing out that it’s a bit like y, here’s a quote from Booker Prize winning author Anne Enright that got me thinking about spatial comparisons and architectural narratives (my emphasis).

A short story is a slight thing, the only thing it does is change the quality of the silence after the last line. Just a shift. Just a change. It doesn’t have to be epiphanic, it can be metaphorical, it can be a change of weather. I’m quite interested in slight changes. I like the silence after a fly has flown out of the window. That kind of change. That’s a lovely and subtle thing if you can catch that.

My overarching concern is with the shape of the thing. And also with keeping it moving, I like the sentences to move, I like lives to move, I want fluidity, I want a kinetic thing. It’s like a poet wants the poem to move and be still at the same time. I’m interested in getting the sentences around corners, and I’m interested in getting the light to change, and I’m interested in them not being fixed, that’s when I say that they have these free running minds – these people. So whatever happens, good or bad, happy or unhappy, to me isn’t as important as the shifts.

(see also: John Tusa interviewing Edmund De Waal transcribed on no2self1.0 and my brief entries on Walsall Art Gallery for examples of those shifts.)